How To

Build a Doggy First Aid Kit for the Trail

Robert Wilson

It’s no secret that ENOpian’s LOVE animals. I’m sure my pup is not the only one out their who joins me in my hammock. When one has a fierce love for the outdoors, often that translates to an appreciation for animals, namely everyone’s best friend–the dog. A lot of backpackers and outdoor enthusiasts have furry companions that join them on their outdoor adventures. However we know all too well that anything can happen on backcountry expeditions. Accidents happen because they are not foreseeable, but you can be prepared. Read on to learn about the main doggy-first-aid essentials so next time you and your best friend hit the trail, you’ll have the confidence to come to their rescue.

 

Tick Key

tick keyIf you happen to find one of these creepy crawly bloodsuckers sneaking up your leg, you’ll be glad you packed this for your pooch. These keys aid in actually removing the head of the tick–which if it’s left in can cause infection. It’s cheap and lightweight so there’s no excuse not to pick one of these up–especially if you’re hiking around in the southeast in the summer.

 

 

 

 

 

Saline

salineAnother item that be used on animals and humans alike. Saline is gentle and works great to clean wounds and flush out irritations caught in the eye. Try the new fancy spray version or seek out the individually packaged plastic tubes. (The latter being more backpacker friendly.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emergency Phone Numbers

ID-10045154If you take nothing from this list, at least pay attention to this. Even if you’re in the woods, if something devastating were to happen you’d want the right numbers to call as soon as you got cell phone service. Write down your vet’s number and the number of your local 24 hour animal hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bach Rescue Remedy for Pets

rescue remBach’s Flower Remedies have been used on humans and animals for more than 80 years, and for good reason! It’s all natural, easy to administer, and very transportable. Whether your pup doesn’t travel well, is afraid of lightning, or has gone through a traumatic experience (like getting hurt on the trail) this tonic will make them feel like themselves again.

 

 

 

 

Antihistamine

benadryl-allergy-ictcrop_300Another first aid item that you can use too! If you’ve ever gotten stung by bees before you know how unpleasant it can be. Well, it hurts your pup too! Especially smaller breeds, the impact of a bee sting can really be a bummer. Break off a piece of some chewable benadryl and feed it to your pup in a treat. We should probably also have a chewy treat or two in this first aid kit we’re building.

 

 

 

 

 

Flour

FloursNow you only need a little. Find a small baggy or toiletry tube to store it in. Flour or cornstarch can be used to stop bleeding of broken nails. Simple and it works fast!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotton Balls & the Basics

ID-100225263Another tool that you may end up borrowing out of your dog’s kit! This is to swoosh and dab whatever needs swooshing and dabbing. A staple in the medicine cabinet along with others you should bring: tweezers, disinfectant wipes, and pieces of gauze. These basics are worth packing because they could bring a lot of comfort to you or the pup if either of you are hurt.

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