Hammock Culture

5 Stunning Places to Camp with the HouseFly

HouseFly

As many of you ENOpians know, we rolled out the HouseFly earlier this year–adding it to the rain fly family. In addition to added privacy, the HouseFly’s silicone impregnated nylon sides keep you warm, dry and comfortable.

With the most coverage of all the ENO tarps, the HouseFly is the ideal rain fly to take with you on your next snowy-backcountry adventure.  Best when paired with one of our underquilts, the HouseFly will give you the courage to brave the cold . With the right gear, you can retreat into the wilderness year round.

While most of us prefer to camp when it’s warm outside, there are the hardcore ENOpians out there, who are not shaken by freezing temperatures.  After all, wintertime in the wilderness is one of the most peaceful times to be outside.

So check out these five stunning places to camp with the HouseFly. Where do you like to hammock-camp in the winter?

 

1. The Appalachian Mountains

Blue_Ridge_NC

Seeing how we’re based out of Western North Carolina, we naturally have an affinity for The Appalachian Mountains. In our neck of the woods, the trail sees four seasons offering a variety of climates to camp in depending on the time of year. However, that doesn’t mean it’s not COLD here in the winter, especially in higher elevations. With the HouseFly, you can stay toasty warm and keep out the winter chills. Bonus points if you’re sporting The Appalachian Trail Conservancy hammock.

 

2. Pacific Crest Trail

http://www.fotopedia.com/items/flickr-4990851555

http://www.fotopedia.com/items/flickr-4990851555

Aligned with the highest parts of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade mountain ranges, The Pacific Crest Trail stretches from the Mexican border to the Canadian border. If you’re trekking through the northern regions of this historic trail, you’re bound to run into some chilly temperatures. What’s neat about the HouseFly, is the stowable doors. This allows you to opt for a view, so you can mountain gaze from the comfort of your  hammock, while keeping the flurries off your brow. Bonus points if you’re hamocking in the Pacific Crest Trail Association hammock. Coming this Spring!

3. Uinta Mountains, Utah

http://upload.wikimedia

http://upload.wikimedia

Lying about 100 miles east of Salt Lake City, The Uinta Mountains are a sub-range of the Rocky Mountains and are a sight to be seen. The Uinta Mountains have peaks ranging from 11,000-13,528 feet, including Utah’s highest point: King’s Peak. With the high points of this mountain range being snow capped year round, the HouseFly is a definite must to keep your body heat consolidated. Fun fact: The Uintas is home to the highest Boy Scout camp in America–and Boy Scouts are some of the most loyal ENOpians around!

4. Torres del Paine National Park , Chile

Cuernos_del_Paine_from_Lake_Pehoé

This park is brimming with breath-taking glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. One of the most visited parks in Chile, the park averages more than 150,000 visitors a year, over half being foreign tourists. Due to a history of forest fire outbreaks camp fires are strictly prohibited, so you’ll definitely be wanting a HouseFly to keep warm. It is recommended to visit Torres del Paine between December and Late February–the southern summer. Their winter is inhospitable to “most” of the public. How extreme are you?

 

5. Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Michigan

mynorth.com

http://archive.aaronpeterson.net/

Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is a popular destination in Michigan throughout the spring, summer, and fall. However when winter rolls in, the tourists roll out. Which makes room for serious campers like you. With unique rock formations arching out over the hilly shoreline of Lake Superior, Pictured Rocks was the first officially-designated National Lakeshore in America. However this is Michigan we’re talking about. So pack up the HouseFly and stay dry on the shoreline.

 

 

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